Media getting restless. 53 comments


Yesterday, in the Dallas Morning News, Kevin Sherrington had an article about the rebirth of Martin Perez, perhaps the single-most frustrating Ranger of all.

Perez was a total disappointment in every aspect. But Sherrington’s disappointment was aimed in a different direction. Inward, toward the Ranger’s front office. I thought it was interesting on a few levels.

He heaved some very pointed criticism Jon Daniels and his decision to let Perez go when he did.

He questioned why, without so little pitching in the system and so few other options, they would simply walk away from a left-handed starter they had coveted as their number one pitching prospect. And why wouldn’t Daniels at least let the new regime take one last crack at fixing him before letting him go? After all, it’s been pretty well established this season was never about winning, so what did they have to lose? Sure, Perez was a failure. But it’s not like he went out and stocked up on anyone better with Miller, Volquez, or Smyly.

His third point was the dagger in the heart: “Most egregious of all, the Rangers couldn’t accomplish in seven big-league seasons what the Twins managed in a single spring.”

This was the opposite of a puff piece.

It seems this front office’s inability to draft, develop, and evaluate is wearing thin on more than the fans here. The local media are being brave enough to discuss it. It seems they are no longer willing to give this front office a pass.

Oh, and don’t look now but Atlanta has a new closer. Remember Luke Jackson? He couldn’t get anyone out when he was a Ranger. Now he’s closing out games for a team that has very real designs on post-season. Connor Sadzeck’s 2.70 ERA and 1.080 WHIP would make him the cream of the Rangers bullpen crop. Only he’s doing that with Seattle.

Maybe it’s not fair to level a charge of failure based on just a few players. Plenty of players flame out with one team only to find success with another.

In the case of Perez, he simply refused to listen, refused to take direction and instruction, and refused to get better. Maybe unemployment was the great motivator for him.

Nobody was more vocal about dumping Martin Perez than I was. I do not miss him, nor do I trust the success he is having will sustain. But Sherrington makes a very valid point. When you don’t have any pitching in your pipeline, and when you are not playing to win anyway, why cut ties with your scarcest commodity?

Fair question.

*****

 

  • MikeH

    I suspect Perez was a cancer in the clubhouse. As you say, he refused to listen and refused to take instruction. I suspect his overall attitude left a lot to be desired. With a team of younger players, the Rangers may have felt they really didn’t want Perez around them. The Rangers seem to be moving in a direction of having quality character players, Pence, Matis, etc, and simply may not have wanted Perez around. I once saw an interview with him and his arrogance showed through. If you have a pitching staff full of losers, get rid of the attitude. All pure speculation on my part.

    • RR3

      You know, that’s a good point. That didn’t occur to me.

    • JacobMcCandles

      Good point……post more if you can

    • elkaba

      That’s kind of the point though. We now have a pitching coach who speaks Spanish and can communicate with the younger Latino pitchers, so it would have made sense to see what he could do with a guy like Perez, someone they’ve invested so many years in developing. But of course if you’re right, and the Perez problem was really in his clubhouse effect, then I can see just turning him loose.

  • Rowdy Yates

    Every year I’ve been here we’ve discussed ad nauseum the Rangers lack of developing any sustained pitching excellence. And pitching wins pennants and championships. As shorthanded as the Bosox were their ability to move around key pitchers to plug holes in the World Series is what won it for them. This Ranges FO has never developed “that guy or guys” capable of stepping up in the clutch.

    Moreover, I’m beginning to think ownership doesn’t care about ‘winning’. Forbes annual list of the ‘value” of MLB franchises just came out this week. The Astros have finally passed the Rangers moving to #10 vs the Rangers #13 (same as LY I think) but still the Rangers are valued at $1.65 BILLION dollars. Their 5 yr change is still +$100% because of the huge TV pkg signed several yrs ago. So, this ownership really doesn’t have to ‘win’ to win in the valuation lottery. Even the Miami Marlines, MLBs worst and weakest franchise has had a 100% valuation increase in the last 5 yrs. While Ed’s excellent breakdown of costs a month ago were enlightening the fact is even with declining attendance with many franchises the TV and royalty money evidently keeps rolling in, win or lose.

    • possumrld

      Rowdy, I think the Rangers biggest and most glaring problem right now is in their manager. Bannister was no manager, and I don’t think Woodward is either. As I said in my above post, a little astute managing would have made a big difference in the Rangers record so far, and I also think it would be making a difference in their level of the play on the field. But it did not happen with Bannister, and it isn’t happening with Woodward, nor do I think it is going to happen with Woodward.
      So for now, having to watch another inept manager for at least one season, and maybe even 2 or 3 more seasons, is the most discouraging thing of all about the Rangers future prospects.

      • Rowdy Yates

        Poss I’m not sure the manager’s being asked to ‘win’ much of anything this year. I think they’ve got a ton of people to evaluate and maybe Woody’s leaving pitchers in longer than normally to see what they’re made of. Many of us excoriated Bani because he yanked ’em too soon and now we’re on Woody for not pulling them soon enough. I just don’t think there’s enough talent on this team to even hope for an above 4th place finish … at best. So again, Woody may have his marching orders and they may be “give ’em all a long rope” whether pitchers or position players and let’s see what they’ve got. And … I could be totally wrong and Woody’s an idiot. But we know Bani was an idiot and Woody’s not operating anything like Bani. So, for me he’s got this season to figure it out and next season they should be more ‘seasoned’ and our expectations should be higher. And as I said above, I’m not sure ownership gives a s*** about winning as long as the $$ keep rolling in.

        • possumrld

          Rowdy, I did criticize Bannister about his awful bullpen moves last season. And we all know he yanked his starters too soon. But this is not about the starting pitching. Rather we are back to some awful bullpen management, which is far different than pulling starting pitchers too soon. It isn’t the the same at all as how Bannister was yanking a starter out in the 5th or 6th inning, at 89 pitches, or whatever.
          To Woody’s credit, he has at least handled the starting pitching way better than Banney ever dreamed of doing. But his bullpen tactics have been terrible over the past month or so. And from what I have seen his team management in general has been very much sub par as well.
          And I don’t buy the idea that this team is still in Spring Training mode, or whatever, so they aren’t asking Woody to really try to win games.
          If that were so, why even change managers at all? Why didn’t they just leave Bannister in place, if they don’t care about winning?
          I do admit that the jury is still out on Woody. But except for about the first 3 weeks of the season, to me, he hasn’t shown any particular skills or smarts or indications that he is, or that he ever will become a really good manager.

  • JacobMcCandles

    Its pretty clear that there is an issue on the Rangers with this topic. The challenge is why and do we have the leadership to fix it. Even though its easy to just say JD sux……he does hold the reins and has gotten rid of every man that was impactful to help in this area. When a team like Houston has half a dozen guys and another 4 or 5 that have been traded off to our waiting for one…its a legit question. Not only are they superior in cultivation but they have tweaked Fister,Morton,Verlander.Cole to make them better. Its above my pay grade on how to fix it other than a change or addition in the people that are involved but this is the direction when you have hillbillies running a sports franchise.

  • possumrld

    I know this is already an unpopular subject, but speaking of “leadership”, but so far, I am pretty disappointed in Woodward’s managing style. Most teams will go through stretches of ineptness, and they will slump, or get swept, or have losing streaks. But my gripe about Woody is, that he has frittered away far too many games that either the Rangers had in their hip pocket, or they had a chance to win late, until Woodward started making his moves, or actually, it is his non moves that have hurt the Rangers the most.
    How many times already this season, when the Rangers had at least a 2 run lead, and sometimes more, has he brought in a pitcher in late, who can’t even throw a strike, who has walked two or three batters and loaded the bases with no outs, or they hit a batter or two the first thing? But instead of taking them out before the damage was completely done, Woody seems to always wait at until least one batter too late, or maybe even two batters too late. until the big hit, or even two big hits. THEN, when the game is already out of reach he finally takes them out.
    Anyone can take a pitcher out after they give up 2 or 4 or 6 runs, and the game that was in question or maybe was even won, is firmly decided for the other team. Managing is about prevention, and having the ability of forethought, and being proactive. It is not about doing damage control, and shutting the gates, after the all of horses have already gotten out of the barn. Managing is also about getting the most out of the players and the tam you are dealt. And to me, Woodward has fallen woefully short in both of those concepts
    The Rangers are going to have enough trouble winning games, without the manager giving wins or or giving potential wins away. The way I see it, with some managing skills, the Rangers could still be at about .500, if not even a game or two over.
    When Woodward first came, he seemed to make some good and timely managing moves, and I was very excited about his prospects. But that time was a very short lived one.
    Now, as far, as his body of managing goes, I don’t think Woodward is any better than Bannister was. And this is the most discouraging thing of all about this season to me. Because players will slump, but they will generally come out of their slumps. But with managers, once they get into a rut, they never seem to be able to change their managing style.
    With some good managing, I believe the Rangers could have been at least competitive to some degree. But now it is beginning to look like a long and a sad losing season for the Rangers, and us Rangers fans, all the way around.

  • calntom

    I will be checking back in with you all sometime after the break or perhaps the trade deadline.

  • elkaba

    Well, after this weekend I can understand all the angst around here. I’m pretty angst-ed myself. It’s even worse being that we just got our arses handed to us by Houston of all teams, the cross state rival team we must daily hear praised to the rafters on here. (Sorry, Jake, but yes, I’m posting to your avatar here. I mean seriously, do we, in our abject despair and misery, really have to hear how great they are all the time? We know already. 🙂

    Meanwhile back at our fiasco of a team, as for who to blame for this mess- manager, GM or ownership- I have to confess I think it’s premature-ish to blame the manager at this stage. He’s what, a few months into his first managerial stint? And he’s been given maybe, generously, a third of a rotation to work with? And yet another keystone cop squad for a bullpen? I think he deserves a bit longer before being tried and convicted of costing us enough games to make even a marginal difference in this season. But that’s me.

    That leaves the GM/FO and ownership, both of which at this point I think are better suspects. Is it JD’s lingering distrust of all things “expert pitching” (read that term as referencing Ryan and the Maddox boys) that has him rejecting the idea of paying good money for good pitching? Or is it the owners only caring about their bottom line asset value and all that TV revenue?

    Who knows? What is known, as far as I’m concerned, is that we have been in this same sinking boat for years now. Different names. Different details. Same problem- attempting to play professional baseball with only about half a legitimate team of pros. The rest would have problems making most AAA teams. And we play the season with no real depth waiting in the wings, just promises that help is only a year or two away.

    Why this is the way this team is being run is not as important to me as the fact that it’s the case, year in and year out. The only silver lining I can see is that PERHAPS, if we get trounced bad enough and often enough, the local media may decide it’s better to question than parrot the party line with this bunch.

    • possumrld

      elk, no Woody is not all of the blame. But he doesn’t seem to be much of manager to me. Perhaps in time that will change. But yes, the team is run the same every year, and that is exactly my point. Managers faces have changed, this year. But there are no tangible management style changes that I can see.
      And I don’t buy this idea we aren’t trying to win. If that were so, then why change managers at all in the first place?

      • elkaba

        Personally I think the players brought the manager situation to a head. Doubt JD would have made a change right before the last year at the ballpark minus that. And I’d bet there were words spoken by certain players in their exit interviews, too. Banister wasn’t a good baseball manager, at least not a good American League manager, or a good people manager it seems.

        I get what you’re saying about there being times when a pitching change might, MIGHT, have made a difference in an individual game. But my point is there’s nothing a manager can do without being given the proper tools to do it with. If he pulls a guy whenever you think is necessary, who’s he got to put in in his place? And what happens tomorrow when an even weaker starter is going? Or the day after that?

        A reliever has to warm up, so instant pitching changes are hard to pull off to begin with. And for a manager, it’s more than a play by play, game by game issue. So unless you want a worn out pen by mid June, like Banister gave us, he’s got to go with some kind of a plan for spacing these guys out as best he can.

        Looking at our pitching stats, I just don’t see where he’s got culpability especially for what’s not in his toolbox.

        • possumrld

          elk, I suppose the players probably pushed Banney out. But now it seems we have “Banney II” or the “new and improved” version. So how long will it be before the players start making noise about Woody, an he is forced out? And your point about the team having shortcomings is a valid one, to some degree. But that is what separates mediocre managers from the elite ones is the ability to get the most, or even more than seems possible out of the talent they are given.
          But it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to pull a guy who has a 2 run lead in the 9th, but is walking the basis full, before he walks the winning run in, or before the big hit puts 2 or three runs across the plate.
          “But who is Woody going to put in?” The same guy he ends up putting in anyway. And the same guys who have put the fire out in the past, and sometimes with just one pitch. But when the game has already been put of reach, after the next walk, or the big hit everyone could see coming from 10 miles away, what does it matter by then?
          And we have seen several games slip away in this very fashion, and a few games which were already wins, with a little competent managing.
          I am no baseball Guru. But don’t see how so many Rangers fans aren’t seeing the same thing I am seeing with Woody’s inept managing of late.

          • elkaba

            I get everything you’re saying, Poss, for sure. I also think Woody needs to see what he really has before deciding when to pull the plug and when to ride it out. And that was one of the biggest knocks on Banister- he never even tried to find that point. He pulled pitchers too quickly and wore out his pen.

            Maybe Woody is just trying to find where that line is for each pitcher before he decides to pull a guy. Let’s revisit this at the end of the season and see where he is then. I gave Banister two years to sink or swim, so I figure Woody should get at least that long before we hang him out to dry as hopeless.

          • possumrld

            Very well said, elk. I am talking a lot form pure frustration. It isn’t easy trying to skipper a ship with the main sail all torn up, and when the rudder is half gone. Thanks so much for your usual measured and thoughtful response.

          • elkaba

            Trust me, I every bit as frustrated. (I really prefer winning! 🙂

    • JacobMcCandles

      Yes I like Houston. Do I think their org has been successful as the Yanks or Cards, of course not. But its the team I follow close to how much I follow the Rangers. So I can talk intelligent hopefully about them. I mean I don’t know much about the Chisox or Marlins. I love TX and my intent is not to rub anyone’s nose in it…….that being said IOM you have to respect what they are doing.

      • azrangerfan

        I do agree with Elk regarding the Astros. Yep Jake they are a good team and light years better than the Rangers. I also have grown tired of reading your post regarding anything to do with the Stros. If I need an update or want to know more regarding the Stros I would prefer to go to their site to get it, not read about it here.

        • JacobMcCandles

          I understand your opinion….and get people have a certain amt of envy or jeaulosy but I just love BB and would love to see TX be WS winners

      • elkaba

        Hahahaha… Jake. I get it. I just don’t want to hear it!

        • GoRangers23

          I agree. I don’t want to hear anything about how great every single person on the other team is. That is why I wasn’t really on here the entire weekend. It makes me crazy! I am a Ranger’s fan, not an Astros fan, and this is a Ranger’s site. I’m sorry, but that how I feel.

          • JacobMcCandles

            Anyone else? There is an air of mendacity to feed, and I make a nice target

          • GoRangers23

            I have held my tongue about it until now, even though it was making me really mad. Even though it made me not want to post every single time we were playing the Astros. I don’t really know how you can say that you are a target though. It’s not like we are saying something just because the posts come from you. It is because we don’t want to hear how great anyone thinks our rival team is. And as far as an “air of mendacity”….lol.
            I was telling the truth about how I feel. I’m really sorry that you are mad about that.

          • JacobMcCandles

            Well if that your opinion everyone is entitled…the apology is worthless. When was the last time you complained about a MM post I did specifically for you? Kind of enlightening don’t you think??

          • Rowdy Yates

            You just keep digging the hole Jake. Always the injured party and pointing the finger at everyone but yourself. And now, hassling Go of all people?

          • JacobMcCandles

            My bad….thought I had replied to Go….Guess my hole just got deeper. Better learn Chinese!!

          • Rowdy Yates

            English would do.

          • GoRangers23

            Jake, I don’t complain about the posts about Robinson Chirinos either and that is because I always want to know how ex Rangers players are doing. In fact, I am very happy that Robinson is doing well right now. I always liked him. We are not talking about you mentioning other players from other teams every once in a while when news comes up about them. We are talking about the constant updates about the Astros team and their players. It got old a long time ago, but no one said anything. We all know you love the Astros. We just don’t share that same love. The rest of us enjoy the Rangers better.

          • Rowdy Yates

            Seriously Jake … this is a Texas Rangers fan site. Not a Houston Astros fan site. We all talk about how good the Astros are particularly when they’re beating up on the Rangers. But you are constantly giving us updates on which Astro is leading the league in which stats and who has X number of HRs and hits and the lowest ERA yadayadayada. The fact that they’re in the same division as the team all the rest of us are rooting for makes it more annoying. I expect the Astros probably have a site where your rooting would be welcomed. But we don’t need to hear it. I intensely dislike every other team in the AL West. I dislike the Astros less than the A’s, Angels, Mariners because they’re from Texas but still dislike them intensely nonetheless.

            You’re the only person on the site who’s ever called anyone a “Stubborn MFER” and is never wrong about anything and you think you’re a target? Really?

          • JacobMcCandles

            Well I am about to put it to rest…but you have posted some positive things abbout Houston Kevin as well….And you are the one that posted about me not being wrong….I might have agreed to be obtuse or said it initially to be humorous. I have posted many times on other players from other teams.

            But that doesnt make me that teams fan. So while I understand the angst of getting our arse kiicked, I’m not the reason. elk’s original post did not bother me….she made a point…..its the piling on after that thats a little screwy.

  • azrangerfan

    As far as the discussion regarding our manager, a manager does not in any way make a mediocre team good. A manager is only going to be as good as the talent he has allows him to be. This team doesn’t have the talent to make any manager look good.

    • possumrld

      aza, I think it is actually the very opposite. An exceptional manager can make a mediocre team much better, just like a professional musician can pick up the same budget instrument sound like a million bucks. And I have experienced that very thing, in real life. I had a cheap guitar, not a piece of junk, but it was not a premium instrument by any means. chap. And a guy came over who was a concert guitarist and he picked that old thing up, and I was astounded at what he could do with it. And it was the very same guitar I had just played, I just played, and it sounded maybe OK when I played it. But that guy brought it to life!
      And while the analogy may not hold up altogether, and yes, any great musician can get even more out of a better instrument, most mangers, regardless of their management skills, will naturally likely get more out of a unit of generally more talented players, than they will an average group of players.
      But in the past, we have seen many teams that wren’t supposed to have a chance, yet they were managed into a playoff by a great job of managing. On the other hand, talented teams can be made much worse by bad managing. And conversely, there have been teams that should have been in the post season, and weren’t, because of bad managing in general.
      In other words, a mediocre team talent wise, with a mediocre manger, will always be a mediocre team. But a mediocre team with a great manger, can become a competitive team.
      “Everything rises and falls on leadership.” And I believe this is more true in baseball than just about any other sport.

      • Rowdy Yates

        While I basically agree with AZ on this issue I like your comparison a lot. Particularly as I had the same experience with my electric guitar as a teen. The one song I thought I could play really good was “Walk Don’t Run”. A guy in a ‘real’ band picked up my Gibson and asked if he could try it. I blushed with embarrassment listening to how great he played it.

        • elkaba

          LOL, I think you and Poss are confusing a comparison of two performers with one between a performer and a conductor. I’m thinking the better analogy to baseball would be considering if either of you could become a better performer by being conducted by a world famous orchestra conductor or a great record producer. Something tells me your playing would sound about the same. 🙂

          Musical talent and skill are not improved by a conductor or record producer. They just aren’t. With talent, skill can only increase with good instruction and practice, but not just good direction. Whether either of you were playing in someone’s garage or at Abby Road Studios with George Martin producing, it wouldn’t have made you better at playing the guitar. 🙂

          • Rowdy Yates

            Yes you’re correct! Plus I’d been playing the guitar about 6 months and the other guy’d been playing since he was about 10 so he should’ve been lots better than me.

          • possumrld

            I play the guitar, Rowdy. But I am no pro. Nor am I really a natural for that matter. I waited until after I was 30 years old to start learning, so that is a big factor as well.
            But I got my eldest son started when he was in his early teens and he really took off. He claims he made a lot more progress learning to play than he might have otherwise made, because he was grounded so much in his room due to his his flagging report card grades. So he claims all he had to do in his room of any interest was play his guitar. ha! ha!
            He ended up being room mates for a couple of years with George Straits keyboard player, Ronnie Huckabee. And he would play at gigs with the “Ace in the Hole” band, when they weren’t touring with George.
            I can blow the harmonica’s fairly respectably though. Several years ago I was in a country music band playing the harps and singing some harmonies. And I was invited to play for another band, but I was too busy at the time, and I didn’t really care for their music selections either, or I might have joined up with them anyway.

          • Rowdy Yates

            1st time I saw George Strait was at the Astrodome around ’84 (?) at the Stock Show and he was the opening act for I don’t remember who. Some hot gal C&W singer I’ve forgotten but never forgot his act. Came out on a horse waving his hat, climbed up on stage did about 30 minutes and the horse was brought back out. Strait ran across the stage and jumped onto the horse, stood him on his hind legs, waved his hat and rode him full bore around the stadium and thru a gate under the stands. All time great C&W singer, must have 40 or 50 of his songs on my iPod.

            Sounds like you’re more ‘muscial’ than myself though our family’s very musical. I’m probably in the bottom 10%. Granddad was great fiddler, singer, and dancer. Mother was dance teacher and had beautiful singing voice. 3 Aunts could harmonize like a pro trio. Youngest son has doctorate in voice and head of choirs and voice at university. So … I’m waaaay down the line.

            Good for you for learning as an adult which isn’t easy.

          • possumrld

            Awesome stuff about your musical family, Rowdy! That is sooo impressive, and what a musical legacy!
            And that is a cool story about George Strait! Those were some different days, way back pretty much when he was just getting started. He used to live here in San Marcos, and I know a few people who knew him back then, in the late 1970’s when he was basically a kid, and an unknown as well.
            My oldest son got to hang out with George some during his tenure as Ronnie Hiuckabee’s right hand man, so to speak. At one point Ronnie broke his little finger in a freak accident, but he figured out how to keep playing his keyboard, even with a splint on his finger. But he couldn’t pick up his keyboard or his other equipment up for a couple of months. So Brad, (My eldest son) used to go with him places, to help him carry his stuff around.
            And during that time, Ronnie used to call the house quite frequently asking if I knew where Brad was. I would usually answer the phone, so I spoke with him several times, but I never have actually met him as of yet.
            Brad is still friends with Ronnie, and says he will introduce me to him someday. But I ain’t holding my breath, because he isn’t in this area as much anymore, so it would have to be sort of a freak thing for it to happen now, where we were both in or near the same place at the same time.
            Brad could have probably made a mark in the C & W music field. He has a load of talent, and he plenty of connections in the business back then, in the early 2000’s.
            But later on I asked him why he didn’t give it a run. And his answer was, that to do it you had to pretty much sell your soul to the industry, so that is about all you could do for at least 10 years or so, until you had some name recognition.
            Brad didn’t like the lifestyle, and he didn’t want to go all in either, so he decided just to let it go. And I think it was a smart choice.

          • possumrld

            I highly disagree, elk. A conductor who is on the ball will get much more out of a body of performers than a mediocre director will. A conductor who is a real one, will recognize the strengths and weaknesses of his performers, and they won’t put people in places they don’t belong. And they will challenge them to be better. In Jr High, I was in a choir with a so so director. And we we were a so so choir. The next year we got a new guy in who was are a real choir director. That year we one 3rd place in the city, which was Corpus Christi. And the following year we took the city competition, with first place with three 10’s, and with basically the same talent. All that changed was, we finally had a guy who inspired us to be our best, and made us believe in ourselves, and who taught us the disciplines of how to go about doing just that
            Of course the analogy falls down in places. But I have been a professional director, and I know first hand hoe it works.
            Yes, sports is a bit different. But still you can tell a good manager by how much he gets out of what he is given. And in my opinion, the Rangers haven’t had that kind of a manager since year 3 of Wash.

          • JacobMcCandles

            Spot on poss

          • elkaba

            Ha! I agree about Wash being our last good manager, Poss. And I know a good conductor can make an orchestra better. But he can’t take a garage band kid and turn him into David Gilmore anymore than Woody or any baseball manager could turn our current pitching staff (with the second worst ERA in the AL) into a collection of even marginally good starters and relievers. The best manager on the planet just can’t do it. We don’t have the talent or the numbers to make that happen.

          • possumrld

            Jake, obviously our pitching is bad. But what I am saying is, Woody has thrown away at least 3 or 4 wins, and he has put at least that many more games that could have been winnable out of reach, by bad managing, letting t=a pitcher walk the bases full and waiting until the big hit, before making his move. And I do not think he is getting the most out of the talent on the filed the Rangers do have
            I am not saying we are the 27 Yankees with better management. But I do think with some astute managing, the Rangers could be over .500 right now.
            Less talented teams than the Rangers have been competitive in the past, and this is the point of my frustration.
            Sure, you can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear, but with some skill and care, you could at least make a decent marble bag out of one. 🙂

  • JacobMcCandles

    RC hit his 8th…with 20 RBIs…..281 avg, .405 OBA Good to see good guys do well

    • possumrld

      That was a really dumb “let him walk” move. Now we have ” A buck 50 Mathis”, with his one whole home run, and his 2 whole RBI!

      • WhoKnowscs

        But who on the Roster now would we not have if we had signed/kept him? (Other than Mathis)

        • isittime

          That would be it unless they did something with IKF.

        • possumrld

          Mathis was picked up because we needed another catcher, so I am guessing it would just be Mathis.

    • isittime

      The rangers brass decided to go with a defensive catcher with little offense for more money than the the old one is tearing it up in the same division. That the way baseball go.

      • JacobMcCandles

        I know guys…
        Just giving an RC update….i think he was a very likeable, giving man. And enjoy seeing him do good. Thanks for not making this an Astro thing, it’s refreshing

    • WhoKnowscs

      His Astros Salary is 5.75 for one year. Rangers had a 4.5 million option this year for him but gave him the 100,000 buy out instead.

      Mathis is making 3.25 mil this year and 3 mill next.

      If we had kept Chirinos it would be 4.5 mil this year + (whatever he would make in 2020) next year but 2 years of Chirinos would likely cost a lot more than 6.25 for 2 years of Mathis. Also note the Rangers could always sign him back next year since hes a FA(unlikely though.)

      I know Mathis is nothing compared to Cheerios, but I’m doubtful Cheerios would be hitting like he is now if the Rangers kept him. Also keep in mind according to everyone it seems we gave up this season before it started.

  • WhoKnowscs

    Looks like Khris Davis has woke up. 2 homers tonight so far, hadn’t homered since April 12th. All 8 runs in the A’s-M’s game (so far) by homer.