Month to month. 10 comments


With so many games against division rivals to kick off the season, it’s pretty imperative that Texas gets off to a quick start.  So, how have the Rangers done lately in that regard?

Not so good.

The past five years, the Rangers are twelve games under .500 in April (adding in a few March games). They are burying themselves deep into a hole before they begin. A hole that is hard to get out of. All four of Jeff Banister’s seasons started slowly. It seemed he never had his team ready for the season (or the for the playoffs for that matter). The only season in the past five in which the Rangers had a winning April was Ron Washington’s last April. And that would turn out to be the highlight of his long last miserable season.

It will be curious to compare Chris Woodward’s camps to Jeff Banister’s.

As bad as their Aprils have been, though, Texas’s Julys have been deadly. Like most of America, the Rangers schedule their vacation in July. Not once in the last five Julys have they had a winning record (and if you go back, it’s been seven losing Julys in a row). Twice, they have been abysmal. July of 2014 sealed the Rangers’ last-place fate with a dreary 6-20 month. All that was left was the crying from that point on.

The margin for winning and losing isn’t really that dramatic. If you think about it, if a team wins just two more games a month than it loses, it will finish the season twelve games over .500. So, most months are about treading a tick or two above or below, then having one breakout month. But it’s pretty hard to recover from .365 baseball in the dead of summer.

But it’s a new year and a new manager and a new system and a new hope.

Here is a month-by-month breakdown of the Rangers last five seasons, two of which they won the division, two of which they finished in last. The other, right in the middle.

  • elkaba

    I think, like you indicated, a season’s starting records is down to the manager and how well prepared the players are to begin playing for keeps. But the July record is another thing entirely, likely down to the Texas heat and should be fixed once the new digs are up and running. There are some who would argue that excessive heat is more of a factor for visiting teams who aren’t used to it, but I think it’s the opposite, and it’s the home team that gets drained by constantly playing in soaring temperatures.

  • JacobMcCandles

    Kind of dispels the theory of heat as TX is 8 games over .500 in Aug-Oct. While I do agree with elk that it is harder on TX than other teams, there are instances where it works in our favor

    • GT500

      The average daily temp in Arlington is June 90, July 95, Aug 95, & Sept 88…in the two hottest months of the year Rangers are combined 24 games under .500…..but the theory of cumulative negative effect of heat may not be legitimate given the significant improvement in Aug….much more analysis is needed before concluding the record is heat related…..using only Aug & Sept “to dispel the theory of heat” does not compute

      • JacobMcCandles

        To present a argument…it always depends on the criteria one has at hand. And that’s what I did…..one also has to consider how good a team is to begin with before we even consider outside factors. Also why I said “kind of”……bottom line I think you can get evidence to support either side. Heat is the least of our issues….as you will see a losing team play in an AC inside dome next yr.

        • elkaba

          LOL, true.

      • elkaba

        Possible, but I’d also think that maybe your August bump is likely due to a deadline signing that gives us a psychological (if not literal) boost for a month or so.

        • GT500

          Yeah lots of data mining required before drawing conclusions, if even possible to do so based on past performance

  • JacobMcCandles

    Anyone see video of Bevo getting away from his handlers and almost gording the Georgia Bulldog.

    • dearmidol

      Yes. Scary.

      • JacobMcCandles

        Got a cameramen….but all is well, no one is seriously hurt