The new Mark Clark. 50 comments


Nine of the eighteen batters Matt Moore faced yesterday reached.

 

Mark Clark started fifteen games for the Rangers in 1999. He came over from the Cubs where, two years before, in an injury-shortened season, he posted a really nice 2.86 ERA.

But that was then. This was two years after then.

That year, in 1999, Clark registered an ungodly 8.60 ERA as a starter for the Rangers. His WHIP that year was an almost incalculable 1.843.

For that ignominy, he won the right to be the fifth starter for the Rangers in 2000. Eight starts into the 2000 season, his ERA was a sickening 8.15.

It was then that he was finally banished to the bullpen.

In a game on July 1, coming out of the pen, he gave up the eventually go-ahead run and suffered the loss.  He walked off the field in the seventh inning with his 7.98 ERA and his head down to a hail of boos (I was in attendance that day), walked into the clubhouse, cleaned out his locker and walked away from professional baseball. He knew it was over.

Mark Clark was never heard from again.

Until now.

Mark Clark went into the Witness Protection Program, had his name changed to Matt Moore, and, totally compromising the idea of the Witness Protection Program, he resurfaced in 2018 again as a pitcher in the Rangers rotation.

Matt Moore isn’t fooling anyone. We know Mark Clark when we see him.

Yesterday, once again, Matt Moore/Mark Clark scuffled in a start, giving up three earned runs in three-plus innings to put his team into yet another hole.

After yesterday’s fiasco, Moore is now 1-5 with a 7.82 ERA. Ironically, he doesn’t qualify for ERA consideration because he has been unable to go deep into the game he starts so he hasn’t pitched enough innings to qualify. In that regard he’s like a long reliever.

But, to put his season so far into prospective, the pitcher with the worst qualifying ERA in MLB is Lucas Giolito of the White Sox, at 6.92.

Moore has given up the most runs, and second-most earned runs, in all of baseball. His WHIP is 2.00. But numbers don’t do his putridness justice. He is killing the Rangers bullpen. He hasn’t even made it into the fifth inning in five of his nine starts.

Jeff Banister’s quick hook yesterday might have been an indication that the team has lost its patience with him. Finally.

It’s time for Matt Moore to do the honorable thing and follow in Mark Clark’s footsteps.

It’s time for Moore to do what so many opposing hitters have done against him. Take a walk.

Keep walking. Don’t turn back. And don’t resurface in a few years as another Rangers pitcher.

*****
NO GAME TODAY.

  • JacobMcCandles

    Great thread Kev.,.one of your best and that’s a big statement

  • Gregor_S

    Yep, Moore is probably done, at least as a starter. It’s too bad there’s no one in the entire Rangers system who’s likely to do much better than his 7.82 ERA. Maybe they can come up with someone who’ll turn in a 7.81.

    Just noticed that last near’s almost World Champion Dodgers are 16-24, as compared to the Rangers’ 16-26. Everyone seems to think the Dodgers are only a tweak or two from contending again but oddly, or not so oddly, no one says that about the Rangers.

    Just a comment on the Beltre injury. He’s my favorite player so I’m sure I’ve got the rose-colored lenses on, but I do think we shouldn’t jump to conclusions that he’s done or anything like that. He’s still the Rangers’ best hitter, and the only who stands a chance when they’re facing some of the elite pitchers in the league. He was batting .310 and leading the league in doubles when he first got hurt, and since coming back and having a couple of good games and a couple of bad ones he’s at .314. I’m sure the HRs would come if he had a chance to play regularly and regain his rhythm. Just last year he hit .312 with 17 HRs in 340 at bats.

    His defense has obviously been below par for him, especially his throws, but again that’s partly a lack of regular playing time. In the last couple of games before he first got hurt he made a few nifty plays where he looked like the old Beltre.

    Now, as for the injuries, yes, age is no doubt playing a part, but let’s not forget that Odor at 23 has missed more playing time due to a hamstring injury this year than AB has and that Gallo missed the entire 2016-17 winter league due to one. Beltre has had a hammy injury just about every year since he came to Rangers including 2011 when he first arrived. Are they becoming more frequent? Sure. Is that due to age? Probably. Is it affecting his defense? No doubt.

    Have the injuries reached a point where he can’t be on the field regularly enough to play 3B? I think it’s too soon to say. But I do think even if that’s the case he has a role as a DH for at least a year or two, whether with the Rangers or someone else. I don’t think hamstring injuries are a reason for someone who can still hit like he does to retire.

    • JacobMcCandles

      It’s always hard to accept when our favorite players start the decline. Does AB still have value…darn sure does.

      The power is gone, no amount of wishing will make it reapper. Still hits great, still plays above avg defense Have to accept who he is not what he use to be.

      • Rowdy Yates

        I think you may be right on the ‘power’ question TY … but you did say the same starting 2017 season and he hit 17 in 340 ABs with a very slow start. One HR every 20 ABs is still the gold standard.

        • JacobMcCandles

          Don’t remember saying that but usually forget when I’m wrong.

          • Rowdy Yates

            Don’t we all!

    • elkaba

      Here’s where I have issues with the whole Beltre story line: It’s all part of the same FUBAR that is the current Texas Rangers organization overall. What I mean is all the issues with this team overlap, are co-dependent, and not in a good way.

      1. Beltre’s presence on the field is needed- it affects attendance. People love him enough to come watch him knock down some more historical records even if his best playing days are behind him. And he’s one of only a handful of players worth the time and money to come out and watch in person this season. So on a team with little else to recommend itself to the paying public, might that not have put more pressure on him and the club to hurry back from an injury he’s so familiar with that he and they know better than to rush it?

      2. On a team missing so many parts, Beltre’s trade value has become more important than his playing value, so same issue with the injury but different pressure. He has to be healthy and playing well to up his trade value come July. Wouldn’t the smartest move be to get him truly well before attempting a return to a last place team?

      Looking at which one of the above won out in this case probably speaks volumes about the lack of discipline this team has going for it from top to bottom.

      • Gregor_S

        I’m sure Beltre felt he was ready to come back and the team deferred to him. He’s successfully come back early from injuries so many times. And there’s no way to know whether if he’d stayed out longer this wouldn’t have happened. Beltre said in post-game injuries that since coming back he had no sign of the injury until yesterday and he isn’t even sure it’s in the same part of the hamstring. The trouble with hamstring injuries is that they strike without warning, and there’s no rhyme or reason to them. They can occur while making a minor movement in the field but not while running full tilt on the bases.

        So I don’t think we can blame Beltre or the team for his coming back when he did. Just one of those things, which may or may not be age-related.

        • elkaba

          Maybe. You’re right in that there’s really no telling if this was a re-injury or just an adjacent one, but my point was that, notwithstanding Beltre’s insistence on returning quickly or while still technically healing, a stronger GM, one in the position JD is in this year, would probably not have allowed him to return so quickly regardless.

          And there actually is rhyme and reason to hamstring injuries, especially a reason for why they tend to escalate over time. Every injury to a large muscle like that one creates scar tissue when it heals, and just like with bone, the scar tissue is stronger than the surrounding, uninjured muscle. Scar tissue does soften and relax over time, but it remains stronger tissue than the rest. So the next tear (and there will almost always be a next one) usually occurs where older scar tissue meets uninjured muscle.

          • JacobMcCandles

            Yep….Good stuff. Now more than ever its time to give him time…save the dwindling trade value he has left. Corner IF with no power is not a huge commodity…..but if someone got hurt or he would embrace DH somewhere…..

    • Rowdy Yates

      Unfortunately I expect this 2nd hammie injury has pretty much killed any chance of getting anyone of much value mid season. And this one was on a routine play where he picked up a grounder and turned to try to tag a guy. Bingo, limping immediately. I believe he can still bat .300 from a wheel chair but MLB won’t let him and without wheels he can’t get to 1B so his value even as a DH is diminished.

      • Gregor_S

        True, there’s a chance he becomes like the Pujols of last year and the year before, who might very well have lost a race to someone in a wheel chair. (Pujols supposedly is moving better this year.) Difference is AB does have stretches where he’s better, though there are fewer and fewer of them. MLB did allow Pujols to play but I’m not sure Beltre would be willing to embarrass himself the way Pujols did.

        Then there’s David Ortiz, who could still hit at a near MVP level when he was 40 but retired because his legs or feet were shot.

        If Beltre’s health is too undependable for him to play third that pretty much limits any potential trade interest to AL teams, who also aren’t going to offer as much for someone who can only DH. Oh well, let’s see what happens. Lots of time ’til the trade deadline, and maybe AB will recover and be okay for awhile.

        • JacobMcCandles

          Wow….whiff there IMO. Pujols never embarrased himself in my book…..and as much as I like AB Pujols is on a higher shelf

          • Gregor_S

            Was talking about how they run, and Pujols in 2016-17 was slower on the bases than AB or just about any other major leaguer has ever been.

            The Pujols of St. Louis was indeed a better hitter than AB, typically batting around .330 or so with lots of power. But since coming to the Angels in 2012 he’s never come close to hitting .300 and has probably averaged about .260. He has continued to hit HRs at a decent clip (though not as many as in SL), but that’s been true of almost every great power hitter who’s also hit for average: the average declines earlier than the power. Check out Williams, Aaron, Mantle, and Mays — their stats in both categories declined, but the average declined sooner and more.

            And it would be true of Beltre, meaning that since he can still hit for average he almost certainly can still hit HRs. I’ve been trying not to bite again on this one but in the end, there it is, you got me. I know you won’t be convinced until he proves he can do it, and that won’t happen until he gets healthy and plays regularly for awhile — if that happens.

          • JacobMcCandles

            Well avg isn’t everything…Ck out Power,RBIs,OPS, running ok and meh…..healthy Cano runs slower than both…..Pujols is one of the best players to ever play….love AB….but it’s a no compare

          • Gregor_S

            I’m trying to agree with you that over their careers Pujols has been better than AB. Has both a higher BA and more HRs. But since 2012 when Pujols went to the Angels AB has been better way better in BA and OPS, and HRs have been similar. The Pujols of SL was one of the greatest hitters ever, but the Pujols of LA has been a different animal.

            Let’s also not forget that Beltre has had a few years that compare to Pujols’ best, just not as many: 2004 (.334, 48 HRs), 2010 (.321, 28 HRs, 49 doubles to lead the league), 2012 (.321, 36 HRs).

          • JacobMcCandles

            Ok….want to talk Darvish or Pete Rose…..lola

          • Rowdy Yates

            Gregor sometimes on any question or discussion he’s going to tell you you’re wrong even if agree with him. He can be the perfect pissant as defined in Kurt Vonnegut’s great book Cat’s Cradle where he says “a pissant is somebody who thinks he’s so damn smart, he can never keep his mouth shut. No matter what anybody says, he’s got to argue with it. You say you like something, and, by God, he’ll tell you why you’re wrong to like it. A pissant does his best to make you feel like a boob all the time. No matter what you say, he knows better.”

          • Gregor_S

            You nailed it. And I’ve been meaning to read Vonnegut for years so I better get cracking.

            No offense to Jake of course. He gets a little obsessive on certain topics but I’ve been known to do that on occasion myself.

          • Rowdy Yates

            Yes, don’t we all. It’s a disease called “being a baseball fan”.

          • JacobMcCandles

            Time to change the saddle Rowdy,,,,too many burrs under there…….I find Gregor to be one of the most intelligent BB fans on here and certainly thicker skinned than you…..but for whatever reason you seem hell bent on being the Sgt of Arms on here and determining what is right or wrong, and usually based on the person speaking.

            Will never apologize for my BB acumen and knowledge is not based on age…and this site underlines that with great regularity. Have a nice day.

          • Rowdy Yates

            …. and there you go. Thanks Jake, can always depend on your genius on every subject. You have a nice evening yourself.

          • JacobMcCandles

            Welcome

          • JacobMcCandles

            Oh and Vonnegut is overrated mostly and FOS about as relevant as Camus. Lol. Misguided icon of the lost 60s…haha

  • Tony Howell

    The pitching on this team over all is horrible, it just didn’t happen overnight or because of injuries. This pitching staff was hand picked and assembled by the rangers gm. And the darkest days are yet to come, either you pony up and spend the money or Just pile up the loses week after week. We have 5 of the 9 position players struggling to hit 200 unacceptable a team could get by with 2 maybe 3 players hitting this bad but not half the team. Pick 2 out of the 5 and cut bait with the other 3. All 5 of these guys are not going to wake up tomorrow and start hitting 275. For the future you better start cutting the weeds today.

    • elkaba

      I would sincerely love to be a fly on the wall during JD’s meetings with the owners of this team this year. I’ve wracked my brains trying to figure out how you’d spin and sell this mess, how you’d make it sound par for the course or a part of your bigger strategy. I just can’t fathom how that conversation would go especially if these owners are smarter than a 5th grader.

      • Fletch

        I seriously doubt the owners truly care. They have to be aware of the futility that is the Rangers, Rangers coaching, and player development. They have money to spend – they just aren’t spending it. Once Texas trades some of these young players who can’t produce at the moment, the player will miraculously get better.

        • JacobMcCandles

          Post more Chevy!!

  • GoRangers23

    What? There’s no game today? That really stinks. 😐

    • Rollie Fingerbangers

      We can’t lose today at least

      • GoRangers23

        Ha! That is so true. 😄

  • WhoKnowscs

    Day off boredom post: Last no hitters for all teams:

    https://www.mlb.com/news/every-mlb-teams-last-no-hitter/c-276325568

    Only the Padres have never had one.
    There are 6 teams(7 if you count Padres) that go further back than the Rangers.

    • JacobMcCandles

      Personally have not seen a no no. I know my Grandad saw Koufax throw one…Scary saw a guy named Ken Forsch throw one who BTW had a brother Bob Forsch who also threw one…..

      • dearmidol

        I saw Tom Seaver’s in college.

        • JacobMcCandles

          Of course way before me on Tom Terrffic…..Scare showed me video of him and how his legs drove the pitches…….Right leg would get dirty…..Very consistent, with other power type pitchers…..you watch that Fastball video and you will see the power in Ryan,Gibson,Koufax from their legs not the arm…although that was essential as well

  • JacobMcCandles

    Of course it will take close to two yrs for TX to open their eyes to legalized sports betting. So more TX money to LA,OK,NM

    Supreme court passed States rights to legislate sports gambling……we would,much rather pay state income tax….

  • JacobMcCandles

    For Kev,Rowdy.and whomever Bob Dylan has his name on a new whiskey called Heavens Door….seems to be a negative connotation to me…..LOLA

    • dearmidol

      Ha, a few too many and you will be knock, knock, knocking.

      • JacobMcCandles

        Ha….yep

        • dearmidol

          By the way, I have knocked on that door more than I care to admit.

          • JacobMcCandles

            Good thing is there is always an answer……and usually it’s welcome, good to see you

  • TD30
    • JacobMcCandles

      Love the list TD thanks….can do without most of the walk up songs nowadays!!!

    • dearmidol

      You need to re-post this often.

      • TD30

        Yep, we need a reminder why we love this game and our team, even when they suck. Bad baseball is still more fun that any other sport. At least I think so!

        • dearmidol

          Totally agree.

          • JacobMcCandles

            As a writer I think u will like this quote that the Scareman shared with me. From the Southern author Pat Conroy said…”BB WAS INVENTED SO A FATHER AND SON WOULD HAVE SOMETHING TO TALK ABOUT” can insert any family members

        • JacobMcCandles

          BOOMER SOONER…oops wrong sport

    • FlappingGums

      Excellennt!!!

  • GoRangers23

    The game tomorrow is not until 9:10.